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20121001
20121001
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> for more information on today's show, visit tavis smiley at pbs.org. tavis: hi, i'm tavis smiley. join me next time for a conversation with former fdic chair sheila bair. we'll talk about our efforts to regulate wall street. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more. pbs.
of the sport's greatest comebacks in the ryder cup. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. over the past week, peopling at the u.n. publicly weighed in the debate about what to do about the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the foreign minister repeated almost verbatim what they called this uprising from the very beginning. they depicted it as driven by foreign elements, as a conspiracy a
astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: three months after upholding president obama's health care law, the supreme court is back with a docket that may even rival last year's term for drama. the justices will decide a case on affirmative action in higher education, and are expected to take up disputes on same-sex marriage, civil rights law, and more. the term opened today with arguments in another controversial case: whether businesses can be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. welcome back. >> nice to be back. brown: let us stipulate, as the lawyers say, th
. >> the pbs section of the show -- >> now you are insulting the audience. >> the 9 people in the world who care about the stuff. >> remember, it took quite a while to figure out exactly what had happened, and we still may not know everything, in 9/11. these guys were trained, with intelligence had fallen apart. it took us a very long time realize even who these people were. some of the original reports were wrong. >> "deception," the word charles used. >> charles has conspiracy. pretty lousy one, if you are contradicted within hours. the think tank commandos and gucci guerrillas populated city. it reminds me of the genius of norman schwarzkopf, another army general who did lead the troops into a successful venture and try and in the persian gulf war -- triumphed in the persian gulf war. he was getting all this praise from fawning flatteries. he said, no, it does not take courage to order men into battle. it takes courage to go into battle. what we're talking about -- >> no, we are -- the israelis are not asking the u.s. to go to war. they are simply saying that if you are not interested in
on all our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you vietnamese catholic drummers performing at this year's marion days festival in carthage, missouri. ♪ ♪
-part documentary. it's airing tonight on pbs, and the book is called "half the sky. our soledad o'brien spoke with the authors this morning. "new york times" columnist nicolas krzysztof and laura ladone. she was asked what the inspiration was for the book. >> well, it really started many, many years ago when we were in china, and we had found out we saw students killed on campus, which was a horrible thing, but the next year when we went to the country side, we started discovering that there were 30 million missing female girls -- female babies from the chinese population, which was a stunning number. partly -- >> 30 million? >> partly through infanticide. some mothers abort female fetuses when he they found out it's a female. we thought it was just china, and so, you know, this is -- china say big complicated country. we moved to japan, and we started discovering a lot of discrimination against women there as well in japan and korea and went down to cambodia and discovered sex trafficking. we thought this was just asia. >> you realized it's the globe. what made you focus on these women's sto
to your head. >> joining us this morning, authors of the book. the documentary airs tonight on pbs and tomorrow night as well. the book is amazing. i know richard had a chance to see the documentary. he's been raving about it for the last several days. >> so exciting to see this finally come to pass after all these years. >> when you're writing the book you talked about individual women's stories. sort of the horrors that they had to overcome. and sort of what input really helped them. "half the sky" we should mention comes from women holding up half the sky. >> a chinese saying. >> exactly. tell me little bit about what you loved about your research in the book that made you think this needs to be a documentary. >> it really started many, many years ago when we were in china. and we had found out that there were some problems in the countryside with women. we had covered tian men square. we started discovering there were 30 million missing female girls, female babies, from the chinese population. which was a stunning number. >> 30 million. >> 30 million. partly through infanticid
on a pbs station for the people who cannot afford satellite. you do great things for education. i would like to ask him as a rural person, who has a highway that barely fits two cars, why should i have to pay for transit when i will never in my lifetime ever going to use it? my mother is 95. she has never been on a train in her life. and why do my tax dollars have to find something like that when it does no good whatsoever for us? and when you give us tax dollars to drive back and forth to work -- and will you give us tax dollars to drop back and forth to work and to the doctor and of that? guest: i would just repeat that this is a national system and there are local interests as well. i'm not saying that the federal government should pay 100% of the chicago transit and rail system. but there is a national interest. you may not use the chicago system, or that the system in phoenix or denver. by you have an interest, as all americans do, in assuring that metropolitan regions have a prosperous economies. i do not know if you're on a state highway or not, but there is a tremendous amount o
will face off in an hourlong debate sponsored by vegas pbs, knpb public television for northern nevada, reno public radio and the reno gazette journal. i'm rich fox, and can i'll serve as moderator. here is the format for the debate. each candidate will give a one minute opening statement. the candidates will then be asked a series of questions from a panel of three reporters. the candidates will each get a minute and a half to answer the same question. the candidate who receives the original question will get one minute to rebut. we will conclude the debate with two minute closing statements. opening and closing statements, in addition to the first question, have been determined by a coin toss. tonight's reporters are brent boynton, news director of knpb; ray hager, political reporter with the reno gazette journalty diego santa yea go -- santiago with univision. shelley berkeley, you have the first opening statement. berkeley: thank you, i'd like to thank the sponsors for hosting our first debate and for the viewers who are listening tonight. thank you for tuning in. about 50 years ago i li
on electronic and friendly one of the reasons we recognize electronic documents is that pbs thye pf that you are seeing is what we would create that print from, and some large machine would spew out paper. so, they would be the identical document. and i understand that there will never be sort of that perfect amount of time to review something with it is short or long or anything like that. but my members did both in the period leading up to the 100th of congress. i know there are lots of folks on the outside to keep talking about the 72 hour rule and felt compelled to point out that it has always been the third legislative day as opposed to be true 72 hours. >> in the political promises. >> in terms of what is in writing verses what were in the speeches i will grant you that. but i think if you look and see what we have been doing, we have actually done that if not even a little bit better. a good example is for bills where we are asking for the member offices to submit amendments so the rules committee can sort of call through that and do some tree all and come up with a rule, you know, du
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)